Passing the Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

Charles Stam, a public policy analyst, enjoys reading about public policy and law in his free time. In the near future, Charles Stam hopes to attend law school, where he hopes to be admitted into a dual degree program, allowing him to simultaneously earn a master’s degree in policy studies.

Part of preparing for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) involves figuring out which schools to apply to and what the average scores are for the school’s accepted students. Taking a prep test allows applicants to determine where they fall in comparison to a school’s average, helping them develop a studying plan. Cramming for the LSAT over a short time period and repeatedly taking practice tests can cause applicants to become mentally fatigued. Studying and preparing over a long period of time improves scores and memory of the information.

Rearranging one’s schedule to include LSAT study sessions can be difficult, but keeping everything organized and bringing LSAT books everywhere helps ensure that time is not wasted. Studying for the LSAT can affect work and social schedules, so it is important to communicate with those who will be affected. This can help prevent unnecessary stress that could distract applicants from studying.